Photo Friday on the Western Argolid Regional Project

After another week of the Western Argolid Regional Project, I’m once again prompted to ask whether this is over yet. This isn’t to suggest that I’m not having fun, but to say that this has already been a long field season! But we’re hard at work. As you can see, Scott Gallimore, one of the directors,… More Photo Friday on the Western Argolid Regional Project

Three Thoughts from the Western Argolid Regional Project

I know it’s cliche, but archaeology provides a good context for thinking. Over the last few weeks, I’ve gotten some good thinking done. In fact, my colleagues, The Directors of the project, have been extremely patient interlocutors this summer. I am convinced that an important part of archaeology remains the close and continuous intellectual and… More Three Thoughts from the Western Argolid Regional Project

Extensive Survey on the Western Argolid Regional Project

 It is almost inevitable. People invite me to join survey projects hoping that I can become a valued contributor to a well-ordered field season. Before long, however, I am sent off into the field as the “Extensive Team”. Most intensive survey projects have a team responsible for exploring areas not suitable for intensive survey methods.… More Extensive Survey on the Western Argolid Regional Project

Sweeping

Sweeping is a big part of archaeology. Some would say that 90% of archaeology is sweeping. In an excavation, it’s really important to keep your trench clean. In a survey, it’s important to keep your apotheke (storage space) clean. We’re hoping that our apotheke will be approved for use soon, so we took the opportunity to… More Sweeping

Week Two Field Trips

Today was our third day of field trips. We hit a series of minor and major sites on the Argive plain. Just like last Saturday, we started local, with the pyramid in the village of Elliniko and the church of the Zoodochos Pigi at Kefalari. Both are within 10 kilometers of our home base of… More Week Two Field Trips

“Ignorant farmers”

This morning, I got all riled up about a comment on the blog for Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews in which an anonymous Briton decried the “ignorant farmers” who, by plowing their own fields (imagine the gall!), have destroyed ancient and Ottoman roads. I know that such things shouldn’t upset me, but they do. The comment appeared… More “Ignorant farmers”